Keeping chickens can be an extremely satisfying pastime with the added bonus of providing fresh eggs for family and friends. It does however require sustained commitment so before you start you should ask yourself some important questions.

Do I have time to give the birds the care they need?
A small flock requires minimal attention but they do require fresh feed and water every day. Chickens depend on you entirely for their well-being and you need to be sure you can provide the continuity of care required.

Will I find the work involved satisfying ?
Chickens are far less demanding than most other domestic animals but they cannot simply be left to their own devices. As well as providing feed and water, eggs need to be collected regularly and houses kept clean.

Have I enough room ?
All the birds supplied by Clogher Valley Eggs and Poultry are reared in the free range situation where the birds have housing for shelter and protection but otherwise are free to roam on a grass area where it can exercise its natural instinct to scratch and feed by pecking. While birds can be kept inside or in aviary type houses with a mesh front to exclude wild birds and vermin, they must always have access to perches for roosting, laying boxes, water and an area of floor covered in straw, sand or wood chips, for exercise and to satisfy their natural instincts.

Where access is provided to a grass area, which is the system we prefer, the covered house or ark can be quite small As a guide allow, a floor area of 1 square foot (30cmx30cm) per bird for large fowl but half this will suffice for bantams and smaller chickens.

In short the housing required need not be large or expensive so long as the hens have the basic essentials of shelter, protection, and sufficient space to exercise their basic instincts to roost and scratch.

Will they annoy your neighbours?
If you keep the hen housing clean and your chickens are contained within your own premises, few neighbours will object to their presence. It is only when the henhouse is not cleaned out regularly that it will attract vermin and flies, which will cause a nuisance to both yourself and your neighbours.

The situation is likely to become more of a problem if you keep one or more roosters. They will inevitably start to crow at dawn and this will not be appreciated by everyone. If your neighbours are very close or are likely to be sensitive to such noise, it is best to just keep hens or discuss your intention with any who live close by. Remember that hens cackle when laying and if startled, and any chicken, whether cock or hen, will never be totally quiet.

What is my primary interest in keeping hens?
If it is to have the satisfaction of providing fresh eggs for the family then one of the Outdoor or Commercial Hybrid Breeds will be what you require. However if you want to breed chickens for the pleasure of their unique colour or attractive appearance and perhaps in the future to exhibit stock at local shows and competitions, then you will need to choose from one of the many pure breeds available.

Keeping Chickens

  • Questions to ask before you start?

    Keeping chickens can be an extremely satisfying pastime with the added bonus of providing fresh eggs for family and friends. It does however require sustained commitment so before you start

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  • Choosing a Breed

    Hybrids. Commercial hybrid chickens are particular commercial crossbreeds based on those originally selected in the 1950s for the battery cage producers seeking to vastly increase production over the traditional pure

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  • Housing

    As explained earlier housing for hens does not need to be large or elabotate as long as it provides the essential requirements of shelter, protection, and sufficient space to exercise

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  • Feeding

    Poultry will eat most things but like all animals they require a balanced diet for good health and best performance. The best way to achieve this is by feeding ready

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  • Eggs

    Young hens or pullets start to lay at about 20 weeks of age. Commercial laying hens can lay over 300 eggs per year although this is much lower for some

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  • Flock Management

    It is helpful in managing any flock to understand bird behaviour. Chickens have a well developed social structure based on the “pecking order”. The dominant hen is at the top

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  • Pests and Diseases

    As with all livestock, chickens do occasionally fall ill and if in doubt you should consult a veterinary surgeon. However good management will prevent many diseases and lead to early

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  • Breeding and Rearing Chickens

    Breeding and raising poultry can be very rewarding, especially watching them hatch as chicks and then grow into mature adults. You can either breed your own stock or purchase “hatching

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The Supply Chain Development Programme is funded by the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD). Further information on the programme is available at www.countrysiderural.co.uk